By Amal Tobich

I don’t regret being an average student

Yes, as strange as it might sound, being an average student is not as bad as it seems! It does not limit your options, decrease your acceptance rates, nor labels you as “a second option” when it comes to recruiting.

Being an average student (B-student) coming up with a pretty decent GPA and an acceptable academic record with no “outstanding grades” did NOT hamper me from fulfilling some of my personal and professional ambitions. What resulted is the total opposite and offered me the chance to discover my other passions outside the university bubble. Education is good, especially if used as a means of gaining knowledge. Once you become a graduate student, you enter into “real life” and it’s a different ballgame. Grades will not be as important as we used to perceive them.

As Matt Duczeminski writes in a LifeHack article, “When ‘B’ students are able to finally enjoy their studies, something incredible happens: They become ‘A’ students.”

Keep in mind: It’s OK to be average but it’s not OK to remain average after achieving your goals!

Photo credit: Anete Lūsiņa (Unsplash)

I don’t regret doing a study abroad program

Fear, insecurity, homesickness, leaving your family behind, unfamiliar food, and going completely outside of your comfort zone: Is your present life, with all of its amenities and conveniences, worth sacrificing for few months in a new city, to encounter new people, live a distinct life, and face countless challenges?

The answer is simply “Yes.” I would definitely go for another study abroad program. Being mindful that a different country may not be a tranquil and heavenly, utopic place at first, it will take a few weeks or more, and some sleepless nights and unsecure moments until the fun actually starts. You’ll become familiar with the place, people, and even the smell of the air!

I can give hundreds of reasons of why you should get out of your comfort zone and experience a new adventure. You will not just embrace a new culture, make new friendships, and grow as a person, but you’ll be in disbelief of the very enjoyable self-learning journey you’re likely to experience that’ll mark your personality forever.

Photo by Mona Eendra on Unsplash

I don’t regret dedicating time to the community

If you did not think about this, try to give it a try. It’s essential to give back to your community by any kind of volunteering! You’ll feel healthier mentally and physically. Also, you’ll also gain a plethora of other skills. Giving back what you already have is one of the best feelings.

When researchers at the London School of Economics examined the relationship between volunteering and measures of happiness in a large group of American adults, they found the more people volunteered, the happier they were.

I don’t regret taking advantage of student opportunities

The “student” title is a passport to plenty of opportunities and advantages. As a student, you basically have access to several or an unlimited number of scholarship and sponsorship opportunities! I got the chance to travel for free to more than three continents and, most importantly, to make lifelong friendships. John Montesi wrote in an article for Azusa Pacific University that “a number of important life lessons and soft skills cannot easily be ‘taught,’ but are instead learned through experience.”

Photo by rupixen.com on Unsplash
Photo by rupixen.com on Unsplash

I don’t regret saving money

“We only live once.”

“We’re too young for this.”

“Life is too short.”

These statements are used to elude the idea of saving money. Contrary to what others say, if you are planning for a fully forecasted, responsible, and mature life experience, then consider saving some amount for specific emergencies and occasions. It might be a trip or something you wanted to purchase. Feeling that you are effectively controlling your own pocket and expenditure is priceless. You can get richer not by what you save but by what compounds over time, and by the choices and habits that you create when you save.

I don’t regret going to office hours

Office hours are a blessing for you during your college years! It’s literally a shortcut to better grades, a more academic-minded life, and stronger bonds with professors, and gives you more knowledge about your respective course. Office hours help you get out of your shy bubble, and allow for private time to ask questions or clarify certain things. If you’re uncomfortable speaking in a class of more than 30 people, this would be an idea to consider. According to ExploreHealthCareers.org, “it may sound like a chore, but taking advantage of your professors’ office hours is worth the hassle. By putting in just a few hours of your time each month, you can develop relationships that will help you get better grades now — and set yourself up for future career success, too.”

I don’t regret meeting new people

College friendships are “one of the most overlooked and crucial aspects influencing students’ success,” says Associate Professor Janice McCabe. (Photo by Eli Burakian ’00). You’ll meet various types of people, and the rapport you build with others isn’t necessarily only about what you can gain from those friendships, but the very nature of the relationship is reciprocal.

References

Explore Health Careers. (2017 , July 19). Reap the Benefits of Office Hours. Retrieved from Explore Health Careers: https://explorehealthcareers.org/office-hours/

John Montesi. ( 2019, January 29). College Leadership Programs for Students: Why You Should Take Advantage. Retrieved from Azusa Pacific: https://www.apu.edu/articles/college-leadership-programs-for-students-why-you-should-take-advantage/

Matt Duczeminski. (2020, March 25). 10 Reasons Why B Students Are Likely To Be Successful. Retrieved from Lifehack: https://www.lifehack.org/288189/10-reasons-why-students-are-likely-successful

Simple Changes, Big Rewards: A Practical, Easy Guide for Healthy, Happy Living, a special health report published by Harvard Health Publications ( https://www.wcsu.edu/community-engagement/benefits-of-volunteering/).

About the Author

Guest author Amal Tobich
Amal Tobich

Amal Tobich is a graduate student at the American University in Cairo where she is pursuing a Masters of Public Administration degree. Amal was the Communication and Public Relations Manager at Junior Chamber International, a nonprofit organization that provides development opportunities that empower young people to create positive change. In addition, as Community Manager at CreativeNess, she manages content creation and social media Marketing to offer Tunisian youth a relatable perspective tailored for their globalized needs. Amal received her Bachelor of Business Administration degree from The Mediterranean School of Business in 2019.

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